Business Daily Media

New research reveals employee pay gaps exist across 2 in 3 organisations

  • Written by News Company

An industry association has released new data that shows that large-scale pay rate discrepancies occur in 2 in 3 organisations.  

The findings come from a survey commissioned by the Australian Payroll Association (Australian Payroll Association) – Australia’s leading network in payroll training, consulting and advisory – asked 601 payroll managers across the country’s big and small businesses and across a multitude of different industries where they mostly see pay gaps.

Overall, 69 per cent of payroll managers admitted that they see significant differences in pay rates between employees who do the same work or have similar responsibilities.

Among these respondents, 54 per cent said they saw experience and longevity in the company as the biggest factors behind a pay gap. Specifically, 30 per cent said they saw a pay gap mostly between less experienced and more experienced employees, while 24 per cent said they saw the disparity mostly among new employees and those who had been with the organisation for longer.

Being well networked and playing politics seems to get employees ahead. One in 5 (20 per cent) of payroll managers see pay gaps mostly between those who play politics well and were well networked in the organisation compared to those who don’t do either well.

Sixteen (16) per cent of payroll managers felt that pay discrepancies occurred mostly between employees who did and didn’t work in departments that bring in, or are responsible for, more of the company income.

Just 7 per cent of payroll managers that saw variations in pay for the same work claimed that it was mostly due to gender differences, while 2 per cent stated that it was because of an employee’s age. 

Pay gaps more widespread in larger organisations

The survey revealed that just 58 per cent of payroll managers in small business (1-50 employees) saw pay gaps between employees who do similar work or have similar responsibilities. This statistic jumped to 75 per cent of payroll managers in organisations with 500-10,000 employees.

Small organisations were twice as likely to have pay discrepancies between less experienced and more experienced staff members: 28 per cent of payroll managers in small businesses (11-50 employees) see these differences in pay, compared with just 14 per cent of payroll managers in large organisations (500-10,000 employees).

In contrast, 21 per cent of payroll managers larger organisations (500-10,000 employees) saw a pay disparity between employees who were new and with the organisations longer, compared with just 11 per cent of payroll managers in small businesses (1-50 employees).

By a similar token, 16 per cent of those in large organisations (500-10,000 employees) reported more differences in pay rates between employees who worked in areas that brought in less company revenue or more revenue, compared with just 7 per cent of payroll managers in small businesses (1-50 employees) who said the same thing. 

Not all industries are made equal

The survey highlighted the factors that might contribute to pay inequality across various industries.

Payroll managers in manufacturing (37 per cent of respondents) and building and construction (35 per cent of respondents) saw pay differences mostly between less and more experienced employees – more than any other industry.

Thirty-one (31) per cent of payroll managers in IT and telecommunications reported that the inequality in pay occurred mostly between new and long-standing employees – a rate higher than in any other industry.

One in four (20 per cent) of organisations in the professional, scientific and technical services attributed the disparity in pay to not being in a part of the business that earned the most revenue – a rate higher than in any other industry. In fact, only seven (7) per cent of those in the financial and insurance services reported this as the main cause for pay discrepancies.

Employees in education and training were more likely to face differences in pay if they did or didn’t play politics or networked inside the organisation – a reason chosen by 27 per cent of payroll managers in this industry.  

Tracy Angwin, CEO of the Australian Payroll Association says, “Our research shows that pay gaps are still prevalent in the Australian workforce, however they aren’t always based on obvious factors. We knew that a reliable group to base our research on would be payroll managers, who are responsible for processing employee payslips and have visibility to individual salaries.

From both my, and payroll managers’, experience, discrepancies in pay packets can be due to a myriad of reasons. While there is no legislation that rules out pay inequity between employees who have similar responsibilities, employees must be paid more than the minimum required by law. For organisations who want to eliminate the gap I recommend they regularly analyse and monitor their payroll data. Often, it’s helpful to have this carried out by independent expert consultant or specialist payroll company, who can assess any gender and other pay gaps, and incorporate this into their monitoring process.”

Australian Payroll Association’s pay rate results, taken from 601 payroll managers

 

Q. In your work, do you see a significant difference in pay rates between any employees who do similar work, or have similar responsibilities?

 

% of respondents

Yes, the difference is mostly between less experienced and more experienced employees

30%

Yes, the difference is mostly between new employees and those who have been with the organisation for longer

24%

Yes, and I think the difference is mostly between those who play politics well or who are well networked in the organisation, and those who don’t/aren’t.

20%

Yes, and I think the difference is mostly between employees who work in an area of the organisation that doesn’t bring, or is responsible for, in a lot of income to the company, and those who work in an area that brings, or is responsible for, more income.

16%

Yes, the difference is mostly between men and women

7%

Yes, the difference is mostly between younger and older employees

2%

 

Business Today

3 in 4 fundraisers have experienced sexual harassment on the job – often because of inappropriate behavior from donors

Sexual harassment is a common workplace hazard for nonprofit fundraisers.fizkes/iStock/Getty Images PlusWhile the #MeToo movement that raised public awareness of sexual harassment is making fewer headlines than it did in 2017 and ...

Cathay Pacific 2021 Sustainability Report

New commitments in carbon neutrality and diversity, and supporting the Hong Kong community during the pandemicThe Cathay Pacific Group has released its annual Sustainable Development Report that addresses its commitment and prog...

Cozycozy, is tackling consumer manipulation in the travel industry

With its user-centric algorithm, Cozycozy fights against the Online Travel Agencies' rampant manipulation of consumers’ choices. In 2019, 112.3 million domestic trips and 11.3 Million international trips were taken by Austral...

Foreign companies exiting Russia echo the pressure campaign against South Africa's racist apartheid system

McDonald's is leaving Russia after three decades of operating there.Sefa Karacan/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesMcDonald’s provided many Russians with their first taste of capitalism three decades ago. Now, the global fast-f...

Jennifer Westacott's interview with Ross Greenwood

Ross Greenwood, host, Business Now: Joining us is the chief executive of the Business Council of Australia, Jennifer Westacott. Jennifer, many thanks for your time as always. Quite clearly the government is setting out its age...

Business success as Aussie kids skateboard brand, Ookkie, launches in UK and Europe

Australia’s leading kids skateboard company, Ookkie, has set the wheels in motion for global business success, expanding into two new overseas markets thanks to growing demand for its products from ‘skateboard loving paren...

Business Daily Media Business Development

Rishi Sunak's £15 billion cost-of-living package and windfall tax: four experts respond

Rishi Sunak, the UK chancellor of the exchequer, has unveiled a £15 billion package of measures to help households with the cost of living, after energy watchdog Ofgem announced it wou...

Jonquil Lowe, Senior Lecturer in Economics and Personal Finance, The Open University - avatar Jonquil Lowe, Senior Lecturer in Economics and Personal Finance, The Open University

the economic tactics that drive Liverpool and Real Madrid

Liverpool against Real Madrid in the Champions League final is a fixture for football fans to savour – two giants battling it out for one of the most prized trophies in the game. And r...

Simon Chadwick, Global Professor of Sport | Director of Eurasian Sport, EM Lyon - avatar Simon Chadwick, Global Professor of Sport | Director of Eurasian Sport, EM Lyon

Cathay Pacific 2021 Sustainability Report

New commitments in carbon neutrality and diversity, and supporting the Hong Kong community during the pandemicThe Cathay Pacific Group has released its annual Sustainable Development Repor...

Business Daily Media - avatar Business Daily Media

Cozycozy, is tackling consumer manipulation in the travel industry

With its user-centric algorithm, Cozycozy fights against the Online Travel Agencies' rampant manipulation of consumers’ choices. In 2019, 112.3 million domestic trips and 11.3 Million i...

Business Daily Media - avatar Business Daily Media

How to talk to your employer about trauma

Chanintorn.v / ShutterstockThe impact of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a hidden chronic mental health issue in the workplace. A 2016 survey of UK adults found that one ...

Stefanos Nachmias, Principal Lecturer and Deputy Head of HRM Department, Nottingham Trent University - avatar Stefanos Nachmias, Principal Lecturer and Deputy Head of HRM Department, Nottingham Trent University

Jennifer Westacott's interview with Ross Greenwood

Ross Greenwood, host, Business Now: Joining us is the chief executive of the Business Council of Australia, Jennifer Westacott. Jennifer, many thanks for your time as always. Quite clear...

Ross Greenwood - avatar Ross Greenwood



NewsServices.com

Content & Technology Connecting Global Audiences

More Information - Less Opinion