Business Daily Media

SME Business News

Another major web outage: why business continuity planning matters more than ever for Aussie businesses

  • Written by Leo Lynch, Director, Asia Pacific, StorageCraft, an Arcserve Company

If the last year has taught us anything, it’s that we never know what’s around the corner. The latest Fastly mass internet outage, which caused many Australians to see the "HTTP Error 503" last week when accessing their favourite websites, is only one many severe disruptions that have plagued businesses in the past year.

While Mercer reports that only about half of businesses have a business continuity plan, it’s often this type of thorough, proactive planning that helps companies successfully tackle the biggest challenges that come along. But how do businesses write a plan that will work when they need it?

Create a Business Continuity Plan

Business continuity planning requires companies to take a comprehensive assessment of their business, as they consider everything that could prevent them from continuing to operate if disaster strikes. Let’s look at the steps companies should take as they craft their plans.

  1. Discuss continuity plan goals

Executives and key stakeholders should be involved in the planning phase along with department heads. Ideally, the plan should ensure that the business can keep employees safe and operations running no matter what happens (fire, cyberattack, trouble with a vendor). The company needs to address questions such as: if disaster strikes, how much downtime can the business afford? If equipment fails, how much data can the business afford to lose? What actions must the company take following a disaster, and what are the objectives? These need to be documented before moving on to the next phase.

  1. Assign a team lead

The business continuity plan is something the entire organisation will need to understand and participate in. As such, it’s wise to assign a team leader in charge of gathering critical pieces of information, ensuring that the plan is documented, and working with various people and departments to establish appropriate protocols. Once complete, these people may also help disseminate the plan to ensure that the entire company understands it.

  1. Gather information

This is a big step that covers the following categories:

 

  • People: In terms of employees, who does what, how can they be contacted, and what is their role if something goes wrong? For vendors, who does the business depend on, and what will the fallback be if something goes wrong?
  • Equipment: What equipment does what? Can it be put in a diagram and seen clearly how it all works together? What is the disaster recovery plan for things like desktops, servers, and so on? Is the business taking backups to prevent data loss? If equipment fails, does the company have a recovery plan to reduce downtime?
  • Process: Does the business have documented standard operating procedures (SOPs) for everything? Does each SOP include alternative strategies or a way to adapt if something goes wrong? For instance, consider the COVID-19 pandemic. To ensure social distancing, healthcare providers changed their typical waiting room process by asking people to wait in their vehicles, where they’d check-in via text or phone call. It’s important to ensure processes aren’t so rigid they can’t be adapted.

 

  1. Document the plan

At this point, the business should have the information it needs to document a plan. Though it may not be possible to create a plan covering every potential issue, the company can at least create a plan that covers the most common occurrences. What happens if there’s a large disaster? What about a significant data breach? What is the line of succession if something happens to an executive? What if a critical vendor closes? It’s essential to consider the most likely scenarios and document a plan for surviving them.

  1. Test the plan

It’s important to schedule time to test various scenarios to ensure what has been planned is actionable and functional. Things like fire and earthquake drills might be obvious, but it’s also smart to test backup and recovery plans to ensure servers and other critical equipment can be restored promptly.

  1. Start Planning Now

There’s no time to waste. Each day we hear about another outage and there are many unforeseen trials still to come. Now is the time to craft a thorough and flexible plan for handling them.

Business Daily Media Business Development

Reflections on stigma | ADHD is not a man’s disease | 3 women in business explain how it's a super power

For people living with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD, daily life is made up of a series of challenges, where even simple tasks like getting out of bed and getting to w...

Business Daily Media - avatar Business Daily Media

CBA offers a zero interest business loan for Christmas

In a bid to give small businesses across Australia a much needed Christmas boost, Commonwealth Bank is offering a zero interest business loan and just one simple fee² paid over the...

CBA - avatar CBA

Riskline reveals top business travel risks for 2022

Natural disasters, extremism, elections and social unrest will join the continuing impact of Covid-19 across the world as the major threats and disruptions to travellers in 2022, ac...

Business Daily Media - avatar Business Daily Media

Supremacy Games to release unique mobile NFT racing game Race Team Rivals

Multiple NFT games in the pipeline, many titles based on global hit licensed properties - Auction to begin very soon! Helsinki, Finland - November 29, 2021 - Supremacy Games announce...

Business Daily Media - avatar Business Daily Media

Writers Wanted



NewsServices.com

Content & Technology Connecting Global Audiences

More Information - Less Opinion